Flow

Zen stack

We need to Accept w Wisdom, Change w Courage, and FLOW around lives challenges!

FLOW

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is the former head of
psychology at the University of Chicago.

Noted for his work in happiness and creativity –
Csikszentmihalyi is best known as the architect
of the notion of flow.

What is flow?

According to experts, “Flow is the mental state of operation in which the person is fully immersed in what he or she is doing by a feeling of energized focus,
full involvement, and success in the process of the activity.”

Athletes call it “The Zone.”

According to Csikszentmihalyi, flow is completely focused motivation. It’s a single-minded immersion and represents perhaps the ultimate in harnessing
emotions in the service of performing and learning.

In flow the emotions are not just contained and channeled, but positive, energized, and aligned with the task at hand.

The hallmark of flow is a feeling of spontaneous joy, even rapture, while performing a task.

Can you start thinking of ways being in “Flow” could help you in particular areas of your life?

Csikszentmihalyi identified these 9 factors that accompany the “Flow” experience:

1- Clear goals (expectations and rules are discernible and goals are attainable and align appropriately with one’s skill set and abilities). Moreover, the challenge level and skill level should both be high.

2- Concentrating, a high degree of concentration on a limited field of attention (a person engaged in the activity will have the opportunity to focus and
to delve deeply into it).

3- A loss of the feeling of self-consciousness, the merging of action and awareness.

4- Distorted sense of time, one’s subjective experience of time is altered.

5- Direct and immediate feedback (successes and failures in the course of the activity are apparent, so that behavior can be adjusted as needed).

6- Balance between ability level and challenge (the activity is neither too easy nor too difficult).

7- A sense of personal control over the situation or activity.

8- The activity is intrinsically rewarding, so there is an effortlessness of action.

9- People become absorbed in their activity, and focus of awareness is narrowed down to the activity itself, action awareness merging.

Sounds like a lot to consciously focus on, doesn’t it? But in true FLOW it just happens!

Fly Like An Eagle

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eagle631

Good Intentions

All people are good.

At least the underlying intentions of humans are basically good.

There is much evidence to support the idea that all people are basically or fundamentally good.

The first concept that comes to mind that proves that the basic intentions of all humans are common and good, so they must be good is the fact that throughout the world many basic laws are similar and show goodness as a theme. Most to all cultures believe it is wrong to kill. Other laws are in place to support not doing harm and doing good to other citizens, animals, and the environment. The collective conscious generally inspires us to take right actions if we are awake and aware enough to notice.

Even when people have bad behaviors if you ask them layer by layer to explain their underlying intentions you will find them they were good. Even though they may be far off track in the actions they were taking, they were initially trying to do good. Examples of underlying intent being good even when say a person robs a store are things like; take care of myself, feed my family, eat, feel better, buy things we need. 🙂 Off track but good intentions.

All of the charitable work done in the world is because people are basically good. The patience and hard work of parents in loving and taking care of their children is because they want to serve, contribute, and do good. A tendency to nurture and love animals in most people is because they are good. Babies and young children are born with a good nature, and they tend to reciprocate love.

Even though there is much bad in the world it never ceases to amaze me how much good there is in people. Humans work hard to contribute and help. When trials and catastrophes occur so many people bond together and help and assist those less fortunate even when they have lost everything. Behavior can be bad, but given the right circumstances that learned behavior will self-correct and people will return to their good nature and eventually contribute in many ways.

There is far too much evidence in the world to show a common thread of decency and good among everyone for one not to see the good in everyone. When we look for the highest in ourselves and others we can always find it. Let you GOOD come out, no really it’s O.K.!

Using Gestalt Therapy, NLP, with CBT

Using Gestalt Therapy & NLP with CBT for Deep Change

Fritz and Laura Perls started the first Gestalt Institute in their Manhattan apartment, and Fritz Perls began traveling throughout the United States in order to conduct Gestalt workshops and training.

In 1960 Fritz Perls left New York and moved to Los Angeles, where he started to offer workshops at Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California, in 1963. Perls became interested in Zen during this period, and incorporated the idea of brief awakenings into his practice. He also traveled to Japan, where he stayed in a Zen monastery. Eventually, he settled at Esalen and even built a house on the grounds.

  • The core of the Gestalt Therapy process is enhanced awareness of sensation, perception, physiological feelings, emotion and behavior, in the present moment.
  • Relationships are emphasized, along with contact between ones true self, the environment you are presently in, and the connections with others in our lives.

THE GESTALT PRAYER

I do my thing and you do your thing.
I am not in this world to live up to your expectations,
And you are not in this world to live up to mine.
You are you, and I am I,
and if by chance we find each other, it’s beautiful.
If not, it can’t be helped.
(Fritz Perls, “Gestalt Therapy”, 1969)

Richard Bandler, John Grinder, Robert Dilts and others studied with Fritz Perls for several years in the late 60’s and early 70’s. As Richard Bandler and John Grinder developed Neuro Linguistic Programing (NLP) in the early 70’s they modeled many of their systems upon Perls work as well as the therapeutic work of Virginia Satir and Milton Ericksen (The father of Hypnotherapy). Bandler and Grinder also drew upon the theories of Dilt’s, Gregory Bateson, Alfred Korzybski and Noam Chomsky, particularly transformational grammar, as well as ideas and techniques from the teachings of Carlos Castaneda.

Combining the Transformational Skills & Tools from NLP, the Awareness achieved through Gestalt Therapy, and the “will to meaning” gained through Victor Frankl’s Logo-Therapy and other Humanistic & Existential approaches to therapy with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) that has proven to be so effective with changing behavior and overcoming addiction, one can bring about huge shifts in awareness and mental processes that support deep and lasting changes in behavior and life.

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RIGHT AND WRONG ~ vs ~ WORKING AND NONWORKING

RIGHT AND WRONG ~ vs ~ WORKING AND NONWORKING

Recently while sitting and running a parenting group, the topic and/or question came up of “How do we start focusing on the positive rather than what’s wrong?”  This topic tends to be a general issue rather than a parent specific issue.  The issue at hand is that we spend more time focusing on what is wrong and thinking by doing this we can fix what is wrong and that our issues and troubles will be over.  The struggle is that when we spend our time on what is wrong we tend to see it as a continual stream of wrong.
I enjoy working on motorcycles. I like being able to take a motorcycle that isn’t functioning well and by process of illumination, track down what is wrong and fix it.  After stripping it down, this strategy works in helping me find the issue and putting the bike back together. The bike then tends to work more effectively. While this strategy may work on bikes, this does not work when it comes to human beings.  Human beings are more complex creatures than a simple animate object that is designed to do specific tasks. Since it tends to work well in those areas, we have the tendency to apply this philosophy to the complexity of humanity.   I cannot look at myself and simply through a process of elimination, track down one simple issue, fix it, and have my life become flawless from there forward.
There are a series of factors that play into the issues we all wrestle with.  Rather than spending our energy focusing on fixing what is wrong, there is a more effective strategy when it comes to dealing with humans and our own humanity.  One way is to simply shift our focus to look for those things that are “working” and “not working” in our lives.  When I identify the “working” pieces of my life, I can then start to see them as universal truths. I can then apply these truths not only to the issues they are working for but also use them on the things I may be struggling with.  For example, if I have the ability to let go of obsessive thoughts when it comes to work, that means I have the tools to let go of obsessive thoughts.  Therefore, if I am struggling with obsessive thoughts in my personal life, by focusing on how I am dealing with them in my work life and the processes I used to let go, I can then apply these same tools to my personal life for similar results.

We as human beings have a tendency to default to wrong and right thinking when it comes to problem solving. That may work on a carburetor; it does not work on hearts and minds of men and women.

Dean N Nixon
Seminar Director, Life Coach