Emotional Intelligence

Unresolved, unacknowledged feelings can lead us into anxiety, arguments and worse. Some educators believe it’s time to give our kids emotional instruction along with their ABCs. Who taught you how to identify and manage your emotions, how to recognize them when they arose and navigate your way through them? For many adults, the answer is:…

via Should emotions be taught in schools? — ideas.ted.com

Self Regulation — Balance Your Health

Self-Regulation Also called Self-Control is easier said than done. Ability of self to alter its own responses, states Areas of study: –Controlling thoughts (Thinking) Words (Self Talk and Hearing Words) – The Imagery and meaning those words Provoke! That cause Feelings. –Controlling emotions (Feelings) Not just the emotions but the physiology shifts that take us […]

via Self Regulation — Balance Your Health

SLEEP

Balance Your Health

Sleep is a behavior

◦Yes it is also a change in consciousness but there is still a change in behavior

Measuring sleep patterns can be done in multiple ways.

◦Electroencephalogram (EEG) –Brain waves

◦Electromyogram (EMG) –Muscle activity

◦Electro-oculogram (EOG) Eye movements

◦Other devices Autonomic measures (heart rate, respiration, skin response)

Brain Waves

◦Awake – state of relaxation       (Alpha)

◦Alert and attentive     (Beta)

–Desynchrony (multiple neural circuits actively processing information)

◦Entering stage 1     (Theta)     –Firing of neurons more synchronized

transition between sleep and wakefulness

◦Stage 3 sleep     (Delta)      High amplitude

Slow-wave sleep

Non-REM sleep

◦Synchronized EEG activity during deep stages of sleep

REM sleep

Dreaming, rapid eye movement

Importance of Sleep

Slow-wave sleep

◦Permits the brain and body to rest

Slow-wave and REM promote DIFFERENT TYPES of learning

REM sleep

◦Promotes brain development

Sleep does more than allow the brain to rest

It Aids in the consolidation of long-term memories! (take…

View original post 57 more words

Doing Nothing with Anger is Better Than Venting — Leadership Freak

Venting doesn’t work. Hitting a punching bag, while thinking about the person who made you angry, increases aggression. It’s better to do nothing than vent. Catharsis doesn’t work. (Brad Bushman Ph.D.) Aggressive behavior increases aggression. Joys of frustration: Frustration is normal and healthy when there’s a gap between what is and what should be. If you’re […]

via Doing Nothing with Anger is Better Than Venting — Leadership Freak

Letting Go Is Hard As A Codependent — Dr Nicholas Jenner PsyD MA

Originally posted on Free From Codependency: Codependents love to give. It is what they do, continually. As I have mentioned in previous posts, this giving comes with an element of return… giving for codependents means having control and they try to keep that status quo. However, despite these attempts, it sometimes goes wrong and a…

via Letting Go Is Hard As A Codependent — Dr Nicholas Jenner PsyD MA

Flow

Zen stack

We need to Accept w Wisdom, Change w Courage, and FLOW around lives challenges!

FLOW

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is the former head of
psychology at the University of Chicago.

Noted for his work in happiness and creativity –
Csikszentmihalyi is best known as the architect
of the notion of flow.

What is flow?

According to experts, “Flow is the mental state of operation in which the person is fully immersed in what he or she is doing by a feeling of energized focus,
full involvement, and success in the process of the activity.”

Athletes call it “The Zone.”

According to Csikszentmihalyi, flow is completely focused motivation. It’s a single-minded immersion and represents perhaps the ultimate in harnessing
emotions in the service of performing and learning.

In flow the emotions are not just contained and channeled, but positive, energized, and aligned with the task at hand.

The hallmark of flow is a feeling of spontaneous joy, even rapture, while performing a task.

Can you start thinking of ways being in “Flow” could help you in particular areas of your life?

Csikszentmihalyi identified these 9 factors that accompany the “Flow” experience:

1- Clear goals (expectations and rules are discernible and goals are attainable and align appropriately with one’s skill set and abilities). Moreover, the challenge level and skill level should both be high.

2- Concentrating, a high degree of concentration on a limited field of attention (a person engaged in the activity will have the opportunity to focus and
to delve deeply into it).

3- A loss of the feeling of self-consciousness, the merging of action and awareness.

4- Distorted sense of time, one’s subjective experience of time is altered.

5- Direct and immediate feedback (successes and failures in the course of the activity are apparent, so that behavior can be adjusted as needed).

6- Balance between ability level and challenge (the activity is neither too easy nor too difficult).

7- A sense of personal control over the situation or activity.

8- The activity is intrinsically rewarding, so there is an effortlessness of action.

9- People become absorbed in their activity, and focus of awareness is narrowed down to the activity itself, action awareness merging.

Sounds like a lot to consciously focus on, doesn’t it? But in true FLOW it just happens!